Automated Smoke Tests for WordPress Plugins

Find out if a plugin works with the latest version of WordPress.


You can search by:

See the FAQ for more information.

Popular

Plugin Time Result
Envato Elements 1.0.6ok
TinyMCE Advanced 5.2.1ok
Stop Spammers 7.1ok
WP Robots Txt 1.1ok
Ultimate Google Analytics 1.6.0warning
Easing Slider 3.0.8ok
PS Disable Auto Formatting 1.0.10warning
SEO Smart Links 3.0.1warning
Acunetix WP Security 4.0.5failure
Easy Smooth Scroll Links 2.1.1probably-ok
WP Total Hacks 4.7.2ok
Bootstrap Shortcodes for WordPress 3.3.12ok
WPide 2.4.0warning
Post Thumbnail Editor 2.4.8ok
WP Hide Post 2.0.10warning
Page-list 5.1ok
Crayon Syntax Highlighter 2.8.4ok
Timthumb Vulnerability Scanner 1.54warning
Widget Settings Importer/Exporter 1.5.3ok
Lockdown WP Admin 2.3.2ok

Most Recent Tests

Plugin Time Result
WP Remove Category Base 1.0ok
WordPress Access Control 4.0.13probably-ok
Meta Manager 1.0.8probably-ok
Custom Favicon 1.0.3ok
AVH Extended Categories Widgets 4.0.6warning
Floating Social Bar 1.1.7ok
Responsive Select Menu 1.7ok
Spam Free WordPress 2.2.6warning
Simply Exclude 2.0.6.6probably-ok
WP Native Dashboard 1.3.12failure
AdSense Manager 4.0.3warning
Tweet, Like, Google +1 and Share 1.7.8warning
EZP Maintenance Mode 1.0.1warning
cbnet Ping Optimizer 3.0ok
Genesis Favicon Uploader .1.1bfailure
Better Google Analytics 1.2.3warning
Login Security Solution 0.56.0probably-ok
Embed PDF 1.0.6ok
Add Twitter, Facebook Like, Google plus one Social share 2.4.3warning
reCAPTCHA 1.6ok

FAQ

What's a "smoke test"?

It's a very basic test where we check that:

Allegedly, the term "smoke testing" comes from the plumbing industry. When talking about electronics, it means "turn it on and see if it catches fire". See Wikipedia for more.

Which plugins are tested?

The goal is to test every plugin in the WordPress.org plugin directory. In practice, we've tested about 98% of those plugins at least once. Some plugins cannot be tested due to technical constraints or because they're missing important details like "Version" headers.

Does an "ok" result mean that the plugin is guaranteed to work?

Not quite. This is just a very basic automated test. There are many types of bugs that it can't catch. Also, we only test plugins in one particular environment (WordPress version + PHP version + server settings). If your server is very different, you might still run into compatibility issues. Treat the test result as a starting point, not a final judgement.

Does a "failure" mean that the plugin is broken and unusable?

It suggests that there's something wrong, but it doesn't always mean that the plugin is broken. Here's why:

Where can I get more information?

Use this contact form to submit questions and feedback.